8 September 2020

Researchers awarded with prize for inventory of climate threats to Greenland’s cultural heritage

CLIMATE

Researchers from the National Museum of Denmark, the Center for Permafrost (CENPERM) at the University of Copenhagen, and the Greenland National Museum were awarded the European Heritage Prize for their inventory of climate threats to Greenland’s cultural heritage in the research project REMAINS of Greenland.

Archaeological finds are sorted and registered
Archaeological finds are sorted and registered during an excavation. Photo by Bo Elberling, the REMAINS Project.

The prize is awarded to a broad group of researchers that have contributed to the project, led by Jørgen Hollesen from the National Museum of Denmark and member of CENPERM. The European Association of Archaeologists (EAA) stresses: “This network can be considered an outstanding advocate of archaeological heritage preservation in a European region in direct danger of imminent devastation of its archaeological legacy.”

The REMAINS project investigates the impacts of climate change on Greenland’s cultural heritage. The cold and humid conditions prevailing in many places in Greenland are generally beneficial for conservation of archaeological remains in soils, but rising temperatures deteriorate these conditions. The project applies new methods, amongst others based on drones and remote sensing, to evaluate the threats of climate change for these sites.

A drone at Iffiartarfik in Nuup Kangerlua (formerly Godthåbsfjorden)
A drone at Iffiartarfik in Nuup Kangerlua (formerly Godthåbsfjorden), photo: Bo Elberling.

Please find more information on the REMAINS project

More information on the European Archaeological Heritage Prize 2020